Bacterial Contamination: The Other Side of the Mask Story They Never Tell You

Bacterial Contamination: The Other Side of the Mask Story They Never Tell You

A concerned husband was forced to do his own research about the effects of wearing masks after a local college forced his wife to wear a mask at school.

Kris Stark reached out to The Gateway Pundit to share what he found. Based on the data he gathered, he found that bacteria can accumulate on both surgical and more so on cotton face masks if worn for a longer period of time.

Read his findings below:

As per the request of a local college, I researched the masks that my wife is requested to wear for her class, and here is what I have found:

I first visited the CDC website to see which masks would be acceptable and it states “Have two or more layers of washable, breathable fabric. Completely cover your nose and mouth. Fit snugly against the sides of your face and don’t have gap. Have a nose wire to prevent air from leaking out of the top of the mask.”

Further down it states that “If you have asthma, you can wear a mask. Discuss with your health care provider if you have any concerns about wearing a mask”.

I have concerns. If I have to speak with a medical provider about wearing a mask, it is a medical tool, devise, treatment, or procedure that I am being asked to partake in, against my informed consent.

Under the asthma tab, it says, “Use products safely and correctly. Always read and follow the directions on the product label to ensure you are using safely and effectively”, so I have done my research on the materials they have told me will keep me safe. My findings are as such:

I researched the effectiveness of recommended materials, here is what I have found: recommended 2-layer gaiters by CDC. 2 layers of gaiter only provide 20% protection for particles of .5 microns or larger.

It never addresses the fact that this recommended material (along with all recommended masks) harbor harmful bacteria, as scientifically proven by WDBJ7 news (Spreading Germs: How many bacteria are trapped by masks?)

To further prove my hypothesis; I looked into what caused the main bulk of death in the 1918 flu pandemic outbreak. I found that bacterial pneumonia caused more than half of all deaths.

Bacterial Pneumonia Caused Most Deaths in 1918 Influenza Pandemic

The majority of deaths during the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 were not caused by the influenza virus acting alone, report researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. Instead, most victims succumbed to bacterial pneumonia following influenza virus infection. The pneumonia was caused when bacteria that normally inhabit the nose and throat invaded the lungs along a pathway created when the virus destroyed the cells that line the bronchial tubes and lungs.

If “pneumonia was caused when bacteria that normally inhabit the nose and throat invaded the lungs along a pathway created when the virus destroyed the cells that line the bronchial tubes and the lungs”,

Where did these bacteria come from? The nose and throat. By wearing a mask, you are forcing her to rebreathe these harmful bacteria that her body should be expelling, but are proven science to be captured by masks or all kinds. (Revealed later)

Care providers and experts of the day in epidemiology, pathology, bacteriology, and infectious diseases clearly concurred that pneumonia from secondary bacterial infections caused most deaths during the pandemic (514). In his classic review, Jordan summarized the key factors involved in the production of influenza-related pneumonia during the pandemic as follows:

“(1) The influenza virus weakens the resistant power of the pulmonary tissues so that various bacteria are able to play the role of secondary invaders; (2) the precise nature of the secondary—and tertiary—invaders is largely a matter of accident, dependent on the occurrence of particular bacteria in the respiratory tract of persons at the time of infection, and in the case of group outbreaks, on their occurrence in contacts; (3) the character of the resulting pneumonia, clinical and pathologic, is largely determined by the nature of the secondary invaders, whether Pfeiffer bacillus, streptococcus, pneumococcus, or other organisms; (4) there seems little doubt that the influenza virus, besides depressing the general pulmonary resistance, also acts directly on the pulmonary tissues, causing capillary necrosis, edema, and hemorrhage; (5) it seems to be true, therefore, that the fatal outcome of influenza pneumonia is determined partly by the degree to which the influenza virus depresses local and general pulmonary resistance, and partly by the virulence and nature of the bacteria which invade the tissues in the wake of the specific virus” (6).

Which just so happen to be the same bacteria found in masks. Some of the bacteria found on a mask are, but not limited to:

Bacillus, Staphylococcus, and Acinetobacter spp. were mostly cultured from the masks and 43% of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin or erythromycin. Microbial profiling demonstrated a consistent difference between mask types.

Bacillus

Methods and results: Spores from several Bacillus species, including seven strains of B. anthracis and six close neighbours, were prepared and studied using identical media, protocols and instruments. Here, we report the spore length and diameter distributions, as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We calculated the aspect ratio and volume of each spore. All the studied strains of B. anthracis had similar diameter (mean range between 0.81 +/- 0.08 microm and 0.86 +/- 0.08 microm). The mean lengths of the spores from different B. anthracis strains fell into two significantly different groups: one with mean spore lengths 1.26 +/- 0.13 microm or shorter, and another group of strains with mean spore lengths between 1.49 and 1.67 microm. The strains of B. anthracis that were significantly shorter also sporulated with higher yield at relatively lower temperature. The grouping of B. anthracis strains by size and sporulation temperature did not correlate with their respective virulence.

Staphylococci are Gram-positive cocci about 0.5 – 1.0 μm in diameter. They grow in clusters, pairs and occasionally in short chains. The clusters arise because staphylococci divide in two planes. The configuration of the cocci helps to distinguish micrococci and staphylococci from streptococci, which usually grow in chains. Observations must be made on cultures grown in broth, because streptococci grown on solid medium may appear as clumps. Several fields should be examined before deciding whether clumps or chains are present.

Acinetobacter spp cinetobacter cells are Gram-negative short rods (coccobacilli), measuring 1.0-1.5 by 1.5-2.5 microns during growth; they often become more coccoid during the stationary phase. Cells are found in pairs or small clusters; the groups form smooth, pale colonies on solid media. All species are strictly aerobic, catalase positive, and oxidase negative; it is the last test which is most used to distinguish Acinetobacter from other infective bacteria. These bacteria can use a varied selection of organic materials as sources of carbon.

These bacteria range from .5 to 2.5 microns. All well larger than can be safely released from a mask.

Cotton and Surgical Face Masks in Community Settings: Bacterial Contamination and Face Mask Hygiene

The general assumption is that both medical and non-medical mask use is safe (2324), although this has not yet been monitored or studied in detail. Studies on mask efficacy [e.g., (2527)] generally do not account for the fact that the microorganisms in human saliva and exhaled breath could form a biosafety concern, especially when masks are worn for too long, not properly stored, or re-used without proper disinfection. In fact, the human saliva contains 100 million bacterial cells per milliliter and harbors a range of pathobionts, including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Neisseria, Prevotella, and Veillonella spp. (2831). Furthermore, cotton serves as substrate for microbial growth (32) and is able to retain moisture, making cotton masks more favorable for high microbial contamination than surgical masks. In addition, the reuse of cotton masks, moisture retention and poor filtration may result in increased risks of transmission of respiratory viruses compared to surgical masks (9).

Furthermore, provided by the same NIH study:

While a number of studies have focused on the importance of face masks in the transmissions of respiratory viruses (21726), accumulation of pathobionts on the masks due to human saliva and exhaled breath represents a possible underestimated biosafety concern. Microorganisms present on the skin and in the upper respiratory tract could be transferred to the face mask while wearing it. For optimal growth, bacterial cells need a surface to grow on, warmth, moisture, and nutrients, which is the environment created on the face mask due to exhaled air and water vapor (56). Growth of these microorganisms will also increase the amount of bacteria that are inhaled or could be transferred to the skin. This could theoretically cause some disturbance in the skin and nasal microbiome due to for instance the overgrowth of certain pathobionts, which are associated with an increased risk of inflammation and infections (57). For example, research has found that S. aureus is part of a healthy skin microbiome, but can cause skin infections when the abundance of this species increases (58). In several studies, the use of face masks has been associated with acne linked to an accumulation of S. aureus (5961).

Conclusion:

Coercion, defined by Cornell Law:

 (1)Abuse or threatened abuse of law or legal process

The term “abuse or threatened abuse of the legal process” means the use or threatened use of a law or legal process, whether administrative, civil, or criminal, in any manner or for any purpose for which the law was not designed, in order to exert pressure on another person to cause that person to take some action or refrain from taking some action.

(2)Appropriate congressional committees

The term “appropriate congressional committees” means the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives.

(3)CoercionThe term “coercion” means—

(A) threats of serious harm to or physical restraint against any person;

(B) any scheme, plan, or pattern intended to cause a person to believe that failure to perform an act would result in serious harm to or physical restraint against any person; or

(C) the abuse or threatened abuse of the legal process coercion

Under US law:

Asking her to wear a mask with risk of being thrown out of class, or possibly illegally jailed, is asking her to consent to an unproven medical treatment that will endanger her health, this constitutes coercion. Coercion is illegal and becomes “Domestic terrorism”. Anyone else is involved in her coercion will also be charged, including but not limited to the police, school security, and staff, etc. Also, institutional fines of up to $100 million may be levied.

Us code 21 section 50.23 and .24 state; it is illegal to make anybody participate in an experimental program using coercion.

(50.23 https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/21/50.23)

(50.24 https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/21/50.24)

Under 18 US code section 2331 and subsection 802. In the definition of “domestic terrorism” is anytime a US citizen or a government in the US is forced to do something that it would not otherwise do. That’s not only coercion but domestic terrorism.

Domestic terrorism:

(5) the term “domestic terrorism” means activities that— (A) involve acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State; (B) appear to be intended— (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population; (ii) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or (iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and (C) occur primarily within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States; and

“Are you in fact violating 21 code of federal regulations, section 50.23 and 24?

Are you interested in doing a civil violation of the law?

Are you willing to violate 18 US code section 2331 that says it is illegal to coerce the population, which is a felony that comes with a 99-year prison term?”-David Martin

Am I under arrest?

What law have I broken?

Am I free to go?

 

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